Boats, Guns, Trains, Tanks and Produce

June 19, (Father’s Day) was a lovely summerish day. While The Legal Eagle and I hadn’t planned to visit any particularly manly sights on our ride, it turned out that way after all.

For our route, click here.

Along the way to our quarry, Delray Park, we passed the apparently soon-to-be rehabbed Globe Building on Atwater. Don’t know if it’s going to be residential or commercial, but either way, prime location.

Spanning the Globe, to bring you the constant variety of broken windows

We opted to ride as much along W. Jefferson as possible, even though the street dead ends. We walked our bikes along some railroad tracks owned by our very own oddball billionaire, Matty Maroun, He owns the Ambassador Bridge (seen in the background), as well as the Michigan Central Ruin Icon.

The end of the line for the Maroun RR

Traipsing along the track ballast (that’s the stuff onto which the ties and tracks are laid) we came upon a consist (that’s the name for a bunch of rail cars hooked together with a purpose).  One had some interesting 21st Century hobo chalking:

Maybe that’s the Denver hobo sign for an Arriflex camera

Another of the cars came complete with a swanky slogan.

We Are Tank Car People (sung to the tune of  Kraftwerk’s “We are Showroom Dummies”

Among many warnings, cautions, and instructions listed on the car, one was up for mis-interpretation:

Is the rubber-soled shoes rule for your protection or the car’s?

A fenced-off area under the Ambassador Bridge looked inviting, but we couldn’t go in. Blame it, like back-scatter x-ray machines, on the all-powerful “Homeland Security” clause of the U.S. Constitution.

Due to?

Our off-roading trek continued until Jefferson started up again, where we came upon a migrating radial.

Tire in the road alert. Oh, never mind

Delray Park is pretty nice. There’s a boat launching ramp, plenty of room for fishing, nice sign out front.

Open for your parking pleasure

If you peer closely at the sign, you’ll note that it is made possible, in part, by DTE, which makes sense, as there’s an enormous DTE facility next door.  Not to mention a giant power line that delivers electricity to our Canadian friends across the Detroit River.

Is electricity included in NAFTA ?

On to the park itself. The water at the boat loading ramp wasn’t the most inviting.

There’s water under there somewhere

Nevertheless, the Detroit River itself looked quite picturesque. As you can see, the park is designed with fishing in mind: There are handy rod holders (and that pylon, again), with a nice view of Detroit.

Plenty of space for your rod

In case you’re wondering whether you can actually eat the fish you catch, well, that depends entirely on the species you happen to hook.

Steer clear of catfish and carp. And remember, cutting off the fat and skin can reduce the number of hazardous chemicals you eat by nearly 50%

The park’s fishing theme was due, in large part to the unsung hero Dave Dorrell, who gets his props on a little memorial marker.

All hail the Urban Recreation Visionary

Fort Wayne (named for “Mad” Anthony Wayne) has, sadly, seen better days.  And, apparently, ghosts. We had missed the TAPS tour from the night before.

Who ‘ya gonna call?

While we didn’t see any apparitions, we did take in some manly sights, viz.:

A Sherman Tank

A Tank-Like Object

A rather large piece of Artillery

We rode ’round the fort. It is star shaped, as was the thinking behind fort design back in the day.

The Star of Downriver

We even ran across an historical marker that is in and of itself historic, given that the presenter of the marker is now just a vague memory.

J.L. Hudson Company R.I.P.

Shortly after leaving Fort Wayne, we passed a small tentacle of the mighty misterarthur enterprises, my bait shop.

Don’t know if that fish is safe to eat or not (see above)

Truth be told, there is no mighty misterarthur empire, and some other Arthur-come-lately owns this fine retail establishment.

L’aigle jurisdique et moi are never slowed by what was, because, as is typical on the TDH, something interesting popped up just down the road.  And I mean popped up in the most literal sense. The drawbridge on Jefferson and the Rouge River had opened to allow passage of a real, live freighter.

Bridge up = Excitement ahead

It turns out the Algomarine was making its way into the Detroit River.

The Algomarine – headed for open waters

The Algomarine was launched in 1968 as The Lake Manitoba. She was refurbed in 1988. You can read all about her here at the most-aptly named boatnerd.com  There’s a boatnerd cruise in August, if you are interested.  The Algomarine’s home base is  Sault Ste. Marie, but today’s voyage consisted of a short hike over to Canada.

Yooper Vessel

According to the boatnerd page, the Algomarine  has an 800 horsepower bow thruster, but to aid its passage down the Rouge, a tug was being used to keep her steady as she goes, avast, landlubber, hard a lee you scurvy dog. (End of nautical jibberish).

Small but Mighty

That tug is owned by Great Lakes Towing, and looks much like one of the ships featured in this video, though I can’t say for sure if she’s The Idaho, The Wyoming, or some other ship. This is the first time either the Legal Eagle or I have been stopped by an up drawbridge, let alone get the chance to see a freighter exit the Rouge.

Next up on our agenda (the Legal Eagle likes to keep things organized) was Belanger Park (in River Rouge City).  A very nice park indeed, and we arrived just in time to see the Algomarine entering the Detroit River proper.

Note the rod holders here, too

Belanger Park has a great view of the water but doesn’t leap to mind has having the most salubrious location on the planet.  To your immediate left (facing the river) is another power plant:

Park with smokestack background

On the other side is a giant Great Lakes Steel facility. (I think they make steel coils there).

Park with Steel Mill background

So my advice is, skip looking to either side, and take in the phony lighthouse. It’s cute, but not a working facility. It’s a memorial.

Ceci n’est pas une phare

And be careful where you sit. Legal Eagle said the bench was quite comfortable, but I’m not quite sure I’m in full agreement.

Planking. It’s all the rage with hipsters these days. So come fill a real need here.

On the way back home, we tried to get to Fort Street directly  but were stymied by road construction, and had to wind our way to that fine road.  Along the way, we passed the International Ice Company – a victim of NAFTA?

Ice unfettered by international borders

We also saw a grim miniature mini putting golf course.

Must’ve been very tiny

The concession area didn’t look too inviting, either.

Bottle Water

We also spun by a former Hungarian [Magyar] Catholic [Kath.] Church [Templom].

Szent Janos’ [Saint John] Saint Day is June 24

Back on Fort Street, we rode by the one, the only Detroit Produce Terminal. (Bet you didn’t know we had one, did you?) Chances are, if you’ve got produce, it passed through here.

No retail sales, I’m afraid

It wouldn’t be a real Tour De Hood without a misspelled sign or two.  This store, (which never actually seems to have arrived), got a double. One word. Twice wrong.  Here’s the perp on one side of the store:

I donn’t think so

And the miscreant appears again over here.

I think Collision House would be a good name for the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland

I spotted a final piece of eye candy a bit closer to downtown.  Don’t know the history of, reason for, or painter of, this mural:

Mermaid? I’m looking for answers here.

That was it for the photo taking – and the rest of our route covered turf I’ve written about before. Anyway, as I mentioned at the intro, it was Father’s day, so we celebrated our ride with a congratulatory Coney at the Lafayette. A nice ride, but a little longer (45 miles) than we’d anticipated.